The Spill and its Bill

Recently we were all victims that huge cataclysm caused by humans have no limit. As long as we go on with our philosophy to be “greater and richer” despite the limited resources we have and ignoring the (must) security measures to apply to certain processes of resource exploiting icidents like this will ever happen again. What we need is to calculate the benefits, the risks and the ecological impact of our actions. As economy is driven my making money there is no space to think about precautions or similar actions. And as soon as things go well the benefit for all of us is tangible (Oil, Gas, my car runs!). But the grown competition and the consequently shrinking margins in earning money are tracking the way to strategies where conglomerates and big companies decide “in the twinkling of an eye” what to do to keep pace with competitors.

This strategy is no longer valid in a media long-term run. We the folks are partly responsible of this bloodshed global extraction companies apply to several sites on this planet, most of them in located in unique and sensitive ecosystems (see Louisiana).

I don’t know how many millions of gallons spilled into the Gulf of Mexico since the drown of Deep Water Horizon and what this means in economical impact for BP’s accounting. And the other side is how many money (if to reset all the mess might be payable by money?) is needed to clean the beaches and help out the wildlife and communities that live in the affected area. No one else than the government of the United States can be once more a forerunner to change global behavior and be more responsible to mother nature.

After the financial crack down and the bail-out ob billions of dollars, and under the scene of the oil spill disaster still to be calculated in financial and economical damage we are still not convinced to change from root (we the people) to give a chance to new approaches in living a better life now and in the future.

I think that BP will never be intentioned to pay the full amount in economical costs of the Oil Spill and I rarely believe that Washington will be able to impose a new policy to the oil industry to be more responsible. At the end the Spill-Out will be relayed to the taxpayer like we’ve seen with the financial Bail-Out. At the end it is partly blamable to the taxpayer itself because we all wanted to live a “real life” on credit and driving big cars consuming lots of gas.

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